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Kobe Wagyu Beef

Joe Appleton - Wednesday, March 22, 2017

 

 

KOBE WAGYU BEEF

 

Renowned for its flavour, tenderness, and fatty, well-marbled texture, Kobe beef originates from the Tajima strain of Wagyu cattle, raised in Japan's Hyogo Prefecture.

In the late 19th century, native Japanese cattle were interbred with European breeds, including Brown Swiss, Shorthorn, and Devon. These cattle originally recognized in 1943 as "Kobe beef" were specifically cattle from herds in the Kobe area of Japan. Because of Kobe’s difficult terrain due in part to its mountainous topography, cattle were bred in small isolated regions, yielding herds now known for the unique qualities in their meat.

Kobe beef is generally considered as one of the three top brands of Wagyu and revered as a delicacy in both Japan and around the world due to the beefs unique fatty marbling and lower melting point in the of fat of Kobe or Tajima cattle over other more common varieties.

Beef from Wagyu cattle naturally contain more Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids, as well as more monounsaturated fatty acids (the good fat) than other beef. This higher percentage of fatty acids affect the texture and “feel” of food in the mouth, and make Kobe Wagyu beef a dining experience not to be missed.

At Zone Fresh our Kobe Wagyu is proudly sourced by Australian Wholesale Meats (AWM) to ensure we constantly have the best quality product and pricing for our customers.

 

COOKING WAGYU

 

Don't cook from cold

An hour before cooking, remove your Wagyu from the refrigerator and bring it to room temperature. This allows the meat to cook more evenly and faster.

 

Don’t be afraid of salt

Once at room temperature, season your Wagyu with salt and pepper. If you’re having steak, season both sides.

Salt, heat and wagyu fat equals crispy and delicious

Searing the surfaces of roasts and thicker steaks (over 2.5 cm/1 inch in thick) will help them to retain moisture during cooking and results in a nice browned colour. Sear your Wagyu in a pre-heated pan for 1.5-2 minutes on each surface, before moving to a moderate heat to finish cooking. If you’re cooking steak, this means turning down the heat. If you’re roasting, this means put the Wagyu in the oven.

 

Rest it

Remove your Wagyu just before it is fully cooked (ie when it is within 2°C/5°F of its desired cooked temperature, and wrap it in foil. Let it rest in a warm place for 5 minutes (for steaks) or 15-20 minutes (for roasts). During this time, the temperature rises by several degrees, thus finishing off the cooking process. Resting the meat also allows the juices to redistribute evenly, ensuring a tender, juicy eating experience.

 

Wagyu steak cooking times

STRIP LOIN STEAK RARE MEDIUM-RARE MEDIUM MEDIUM-WELL WELL DONE
Temperature 52-54.5°C
125-130°F
54-60°C
130-140°F
60-65.5°C
140-150°F
65.5-71°C
150-160°F
71-76.5°C
160-170°F
1.5 cm Steak 2 mins 2-3 mins 3-4 mins 4-5 mins 5-6 mins
2cm Steak 2-3 mins 3-4 mins 4-5 mins 5-6 mins 6-7 mins
2.5cm Steak 3-4 mins 4-5 mins 6-7 mins 7-8 mins 8-9 mins
4cm Steak 5-6 mins 6-7 mins 8-9 mins 10-11 mins 11-12 mins

 

Wagyu roasting times

DONENESS DESCRIPTION MEAT THERMOMETER READING
Rare Red with cold, soft center 52-54.5°C / 125-130°F
Medium-Rare Red with warm, somewhat firm center 57-60°C / 135-140°F
Medium Pink and firm throughout 60-65.5°C / 140-150°F
Medium-well Pink line in center, quite firm 65.5-68°C / 150-155°F
Well-done Gray-brown throughout and completely firm 71-74°C / 160-165°F

 

Sources:
https://www.firstlight.farm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kobe_beef


 


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